The stigma surrounding getting a tutor is false

When I came to Wake Forest, I came in with this idea that I would be able to succeed academically without any help. I did not expect to visit the Learning Assistance Center (LAC) or getting a tutor.

I had this blind optimism of coming to college and being able to handle everything that came at me independently without needing help. I thought that since I was in college, I should be doing things on my own. I thought that since I had gotten in here that I would be able to do just fine on my own.

However, that optimistic ideal was extremely wrong. While I wanted to be able to succeed on my own, I learned that part of success is asking for help when you need it.

The reason that so many students here are successful is because of the many opportunities that Wake Forest offers.

The LAC is a great resource for receiving help and clarifying any questions about class material. Oftentimes, you can get a tutor through the center as well. Wake Forest also has a writing center and a math center to utilize.

While there are so many options for academic aide, I see many students not taking this resources at face value.   

There is this stigma around getting help and having a tutor, or so I thought as a freshman, but I have come to realize that it is actually important to ditch this mentality and do what you have to do to perform well.

If a class offers help sessions or has tutors available, utilize it. Other students are, so do not disadvantage yourself by not receiving help.

What I have learned in my time here over the past year is that you are not any less smart by having a tutor — you are doing the right thing for you and for your education. That does not show incompetence; it shows maturity.

One of the best decisions I have made at Wake Forest is asking for help. I saw that I would not be able to do as well as I would have wanted, so I’ve done everything possible to succeed this semester.

While I was skeptical at first of the perception others would have of me, I came to understand that there is no valid reason for a stigma of having a tutor.

Students do what they need to do to academically succeed, and part of that success comes by understanding what that need is and embracing how to overcome any challenges that arise.