Opinion
The election recount has no merit
Old Gold & Black
By
Staff Writer
Saturday, December 3, 2016

In the months leading up to the election on Nov. 8, there was speculation of election fraud coming out of the Trump campaign.

The mainstream media, along with the Clinton campaign, rightfully derided the Trump team for its baseless claims. Carelessly suggesting that the election results are faulty has serious negative implications on our democracy, as it puts the legitimacy of the presidency at stake.

After the election, when President-elect Donald Trump shocked the world, the conspiracies were put to rest by his campaign.

Yet Hillary Clinton supporters, distraught by their loss, in recent days have begun making similar baseless claims. The Clinton campaign is now supporting Jill Stein’s recount efforts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, three states that were expected to go blue, but instead narrowly fell to Trump and cost Clinton the election.

In a blog post, Clinton lawyer Marc Elias admitted that his team has “not uncovered any actionable evidence of hacking or outside attempts to alter the voting technology.”

They are simply urging for a recount because of “hundreds of messages, e-mails and calls urging us to do something, anything, to investigate claims that the election results were hacked and altered in a way to disadvantage Secretary Clinton.”

These unfounded messages, e-mails and calls are not grounds for questioning the integrity of our polling process, and dignifying them with legitimacy is highly hypocritical of the Clinton team.

Clinton may have won the popular vote, but she lost the election thanks to an electoral college system that she clearly consented to prior to the election.

If Clinton supporters want to ensure that the country does not go in the wrong direction during the Trump presidency, baselessly questioning the election results will not help their case.

These folks are taking a play right out of Trump’s book, and quite frankly are embarrassing their cause. If the team is to go far enough to admit that there is no evidence of an altered result, they should instead spend their time determining how they lost the election to a poorly funded campaign with a remarkably lean ground game that was pushing the most polarizing candidate since favorability statistics have been calculated.

Clinton supporters must also work on grassroot efforts to ensure that Trump is kept in line and does not overstep constitutional boundaries and they must ensure that their candidates are elected in 2018.

After all, the election was a blow to the Democratic Party down the ballot, not just at the top of the ticket. Democrats must further recognize that pushing a candidate who is the epitome of the establishment is not what our country is looking for.

The people have soundly rejected politics as usual, and for better or worse, if Democrats want to regain the presidency in four years, it is vital that they choose a candidate with a decidedly more populist message than Clinton was willing to push.