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Is there a price for happiness?
By
Editorial Staff
Thursday, March 2, 2017

A new institute dedicated to studying human flourishing and happiness…what could possibly be wrong?

Interviews with: James Otteson, Gale Sigal and James Hans.

Hosted and Produced by: Melissa Libutti and Heather Hartel

Technical Producer: Emily Eisert

  • tdaly29

    Congratulation to OG&B on its newest endeavor, UNMASKED.
    The podcast on the Eudaimonia
    Institute was excellent. (http://wfuogb.com/2017/03/is-there-a-price-for-happiness/)

    From its earliest days Wake embraced academic freedom. Evolution was taught, “dangerous” thoughts were debated, and later long time relationships were broken to foster academic freedom. Now, unfortunately, Wake allows organizations to not only donate but to pick the instructor
    and text of the EudaimoniaInstitute. While the contract with Wake Forest University was not disclosed,the contract resulted in the creation of a Moral Foundations of Capitalism (MFOC) center, a MFOC course, a MFOC
    speaker series, faculty and staff partially compensated through the contract
    payments, and formal distribution of Atlas Shrugged to all undergraduate
    business majors.

    How exactly did James Otteson end up as the professor? To
    quote from Dark Money, The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the
    Rise of the Radical Right, he has a close connection to the Koch
    organizations, ‘But during another session at the (Koch) summit that June, a speaker explained to the donors just how deliberate and politically disarming the term was. James Otteson, a conservative professor of political economy at Wake Forest University called it “a game-changer.” In fact, he told the donor group he was planning to build a “well-being” center at Wake Forest, where he
    already was executive director of the BB&T Center for the Study of
    Capitalism. One anecdote, he said, illustrated the “power of positive
    framing” free market theories as a movement to promote”well-being”. He recountedthat a colleague whom he described as a prominent “left wing political scientist” who “rails” against Republicans and capitalism, had
    been so entranced by the idea of studying the factors contributing to human
    well-being that he had said, “you know, I’d even be willing to take the
    Koch money for that.” Upon hearing this the donors laughed out loud. “Who can be against well-being? The framing is absolutelycritical,” Otteson exclaimed.’ (pages 363-364) And later ‘. As an example the report profiled the trailblazing record of John Allison, the former Cato Institute chairman, who had overseen grants to sixty three collegeswhile running BB&T bank. All of
    these programs were required to teach his favorite philosopher, the celebrator
    of self-interest, Ayn Rand….’ (pages 365-365)
    How does the study of Ayn Rand promote the
    spirit of pro humanitate? It is one
    thing to promote free-market ideals ( Friedman and Hayek), quite another to
    promote an author who states “It was the morality of altruism
    that undercut America and is now destroying her.” Rand also states “Capitalism
    and altruism are incompatible; they are philosophical opposites; they cannot
    co-exist in the same man or in the same society.” Rand is in violent disagreement with Wake’s heritage, “Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as
    ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done
    it unto me.”
    It is time to debate if the costs outweigh the benefits of the Eudaimonia
    Institute.

    Tom Daly ’69

  • tdaly29

    Congratulation to OG&B on its newest endeavor, UNMASKED.
    The podcast on the Eudaimonia
    Institute was excellent.
    (http://wfuogb.com/2017/03/is-there-a-price-for-happiness/)

    From its earliest days Wake embraced academic freedom. Evolution was taught, “dangerous” thoughts were debated, and later long time relationships were broken to foster academic freedom. Now, unfortunately, Wake allows organizations to not only donate but to pick the instructor
    and text of the Eudaimonia Institute. While the contract with Wake Forest University was not disclosed, the contract resulted in the creation of a Moral Foundations of Capitalism (MFOC) center, a MFOC course, a MFOC
    speaker series, faculty and staff partially compensated through the contract
    payments, and formal distribution of Atlas Shrugged to all undergraduate
    business majors.

    How exactly did James Otteson end up as the professor?
    To quote from Dark Money, The Hidden History of the Billionaires
    Behind the Rise of the Radical Right he has a close connection to the Koch
    organizations, ‘But during another session at the (Koch) summit that June, a
    speaker explained to the donors just how deliberate and politically disarming the term was. James Otteson, a conservative professor of political economy at Wake Forest University called it “a game-changer.” In fact, he told the donor group he was planning to build a “well-being” center at Wake Forest, where he
    already was executive director of the BB&T Center for the Study of
    Capitalism. One anecdote, he said, illustrated the “power of positive
    framing” free market theories as a movement to promote
    “well-being”. He recounted that a colleague whom he described as a prominent “left wing political scientist”who “rails” against Republicans and capitalism, had been so entranced by the idea of studying the factors contributing to human well-being that he had said, “you know, I’d even be willing to take the Koch money for that.” Upon hearing this the donors laughed out
    loud. “Who can be against well-being? The framing is absolutely critical,” Otteson exclaimed.’ (pages 363-364) And later ‘. As an example the report
    profiled the trailblazing record of John Allison, the former Cato Institute
    chairman, who had overseen grants to sixty three colleges while running
    BB&T bank. All of these programs
    were required to teach his favorite philosopher, the celebrator of
    self-interest, Ayn Rand….’ (pages 365-365)

    How does the study of Ayn Rand promote the spirit of pro humanitate? It is one
    thing to promote free-market ideals ( Friedman and Hayek), quite another to
    promote an author who states “It was the morality of altruism
    that undercut America and is now destroying her.” Rand also states “Capitalism
    and altruism are incompatible; they are philosophical opposites; they cannot
    co-exist in the same man or in the same society.” Rand is in violent disagreement with Wake’s heritage, ”
    Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done
    it unto me.”

    It is time to debate if the costs outweigh the benefits of the Eudaimonia
    Institute.

  • Chuck Wils

    Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty [and the price of academic integrity at our universities].

  • Judith Madera

    Bravo to Melissa Libutti and Heather Hartel for their fine work. Your professors are listening.

  • tdaly29

    Congratulation to OG&B on its newest endeavor, UNMASKED.
    The podcast on the Eudaimonia
    Institute was excellent. My compliments to Melissa Libutti, Heather Hartel and Emily Eisert

    From its earliest days Wake embraced academic
    freedom. Evolution was taught, “dangerous”
    thoughts were debated, and later long time relationships were broken to foster
    academic freedom. Now, unfortunately, Wake allows organizations to not only donate but to pick the instructor
    and text of the Eudaimonia
    Institute. While the contract with Wake Forest University was not disclosed,
    the contract resulted in the creation of a Moral Foundations of Capitalism
    (MFOC) center, a MFOC course, a MFOC
    speaker series, faculty and staff partially compensated through the contract
    payments, and formal distribution of Atlas Shrugged to all undergraduate
    business majors.

    How exactly did James
    Otteson end up as the professor? To
    quote from Dark Money, The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the
    Rise of the Radical Right he has a close connection to the Koch
    organizations, ‘But during another session at the (Koch) summit that June, a
    speaker explained to the donors just how
    deliberate and politically disarming the term was. James Otteson, a
    conservative professor of political economy at Wake Forest University called
    it “a game-changer.” In fact, he told the donor group he was
    planning to build a “well-being” center at Wake Forest, where he
    already was executive director of the BB&T Center for the Study of
    Capitalism. One anecdote, he said, illustrated the “power of positive
    framing” free market theories as a movement to promote
    “well-being”. He recounted
    that a colleague whom he described as a prominent “left wing political
    scientist” who “rails” against Republicans and capitalism, had
    been so entranced by the idea of studying the factors contributing to human
    well-being that he had said, “you know, I’d even be willing to take the
    Koch money for that.” Upon hearing
    this the donors laughed out loud. “Who can be against well-being? The framing is absolutely
    critical,” Otteson exclaimed.’
    (pages 363-364) And later ‘. As
    an example the report profiled the trailblazing record of John Allison, the
    former Cato Institute chairman, who had overseen grants to sixty three colleges
    while running BB&T bank. All of
    these programs were required to teach his favorite philosopher, the celebrator
    of self-interest, Ayn Rand….’ (pages 365-365)

    Does the study of Ayn Rand promote the
    spirit of pro humanitate? It is one
    thing to promote free-market ideals ( Friedman and Hayek), quite another to
    promote an author who states “It was the morality of altruism
    that undercut America and is now destroying her.” Rand also states “Capitalism
    and altruism are incompatible; they are philosophical opposites; they cannot
    co-exist in the same man or in the same society.” Rand is in violent disagreement with Wake’s heritage, ”
    Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as
    ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done
    it unto me.”

    It is time to debate if the costs outweigh the benefits of the Eudaimonia
    Institute.

    Tom Daly ’69