Reviews
Funny new TV series is based on best-selling novel
By
Contributing Writer
Thursday, April 13, 2017

First a best-selling novel by Liane Moriarty, Big Little Lies continues its success on the television screen.

The comedy-drama, which stars Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman and Shaliene Woodley, premiered in February on HBO and has kept viewers on their toes ever since.

While there are some minor changes from the book, Big Little Lies holds tight to the general storyline and certainly does not disappoint fans of Moriarty’s original novel.

The harrowing story truly comes to life on screen, and its transition is certainly not something you want to miss.

Set in the quaint town of Monterey, California, the show focuses on the lives of three mothers who all have children in the same kindergarten class.

Madeline Mackenzie (Reese Witherspoon) is the loud, opinionated mom of the group.

Divorced and re-married, she is always at the center of town drama.

Celeste (Nicole Kidman), a former lawyer and Madeline’s best friend, tries to stay out of the petty squabbling that Madeline is so often involved in. Although her home life with her rich, attractive husband seems perfect, she has secrets that are far from enviable. Jane (Shaliene Woodley), a young mom with a violent past, is taken under the wings of Madeline and Celeste after her son is accused of bullying on the first day of school.

These three women form a solid support system, and while they pretend to tell each other everything, many things are often left unsaid.

Their lives appear to be the definition of perfection: perfect families, perfect schools, perfect houses.

Yet, like the title of the mini-series alludes to, this perfection is a lie. Madeline, Celeste, and Jane, along with many of the other moms of Monterey, harbor secrets of their own—secrets so dark they often don’t believe them themselves.

Big Little Lies is funny, thrilling, and even a little disturbing at times. It twists and turns constantly, leaving the audience in awe of its incredible complexity.

The writers of the show are able to take seemingly insignificant conflict and create an underlying problem —  one that has to do the little lies we tell everyday.