Opinion
Pre-Orientation programs can make lasting impacts
Old Gold & Black
By
Staff Columnist
Friday, September 1, 2017

Coming to college is very scary — we all know that.

One must learn the buildings, the social life, make friends and so much more. In a general sense, one must learn how to navigate the campus in its many realms.

As I was coming into Wake Forest, I was very worried about college. So I decided to partake in a Pre-Orientation. Since then, I have worked as a moderator/leader in B.U.I.L.D (a social-justice- themed Pre-Orientation). The joy I get out of leading a Pre-Orientation is immense because as a moderator, you are the first person the upcoming first-years know, plus you become someone who can change someone’s college career.

I remember the help my leader for B.U.I.L.D and SPARC gave me throughout my first year, and how much of an impact they had on who I am today.

It is because of my leaders I find myself surrounded by people who love me and support me. Not only this, but it also prompted me with opportunties to get involveded on campus and since then allowed me to come out of my own shell and get to know the amazing people on this campus. The happiness and support they gave me really motivated me to help someone who was in my position just one year ago. Since I have been a moderator for two years’ and I plan to continue to work with B.U.I.L.D my senior year, hopefully as the student director.

I tell people that Pre-Orientation camps are fun and that you will get free friends. I met some of my best friends in my program three years ago. I also met some temporary friends, yet we still shared many nice memories and they helped me feel part of a community just in my opening days and weeks.

I was able to have these networks of friends because of the extensive number of spectacular upperclassmen and fellow first years just in my first three days. And it’s thanks to the upperclassmen who put on these programs I had such an amazing experience. We all as students have the ability to shape and change the life’s of the upcoming classes of Wake Forest and make them feel both included and loved as fellow members of the Wake Forest community.