Deacons Should Practice Library Etiquette

As the week before spring break continues, another midterm season at Wake Forest has reached its height. For most students, exam periods mean long, stressful hours spent studying in the ZSR Library.

Midterms create a taxing environment for every Wake Forest student, so it’s an important time to remember to show consideration for our fellow Demon Deacons. Specifically, we must carefully keep in mind how we share library space.

In the ZSR Library, especially in the atrium, it is a common occurance to see students’ belongings spread out on tables for hours on end — but with no students to be found. As a result, it can be frustrating to look for a seat and to be unable to find one, not because students are actively using the space, but because they have left the library without taking their books and backpacks with them to free the space.

The Editorial Board of the Old Gold & Black appreciates the kindness typical of the Wake Forest study body. We’re always willing to make room for a friend at the Pit or ask for an unused seat at an extra table. Yet, when it comes to the library during midterms, this kindness is replaced by cold stares from students furiously studying with headphones on, an indicator of “don’t talk to me right now.”    

As students, we understand the great stress midterms places upon the shoulders of students. Perhaps, we could all be a little better to one another — we all are in the same boat, after all, and reserving unneeded study space for a few hours isn’t going to get anyone a better grade on their exam.

The trust inherent in Wake Forest culture that allows students to leave their belongings behind for a few minutes to purchase lunch from Benson, for example, is important. However, there is a big difference between leaving your belongings only to return quickly and occupying prime library space for hours while you spend extended time outside the library.

The Editorial Board of Old Gold & Black believes that students should be more cognizant of this fine line.

With an ever-growing student body, space is beginning to become more and more preciously commodified.

In the spirit of Pro Humanitate, we kindly ask that students share the space and take their things with them when they leave the library (or any study space, for that matter).