Amanda Wilcox
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Online Managing Editor
Amanda is a junior from Alexandria, Virginia by Washington, D.C. and is majoring in economics and minoring in history. She loves discussing politics and economics with anyone who will listen, swimming backstroke, and working with her College Fed Challenge team. "The West Wing" is her favorite television show of all time and she longs for a Bartlet administration.
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ARTICLES BY Amanda Wilcox
A Tribute to Public Intellectual Stephen Hawking
Opinion · By

Stephen Hawking, the brilliant Cambridge University theoretical physicist and cosmologist, liked to note that he was born 300 years to the day after the death of Galileo. It seems a fitting bookend that he passed away on the 139th anniversary of Albert Einstein’s birth — Pi Day.

March 22, 2018
Gun Control Intransigence is Difficult to Overcome
Opinion · By

“Those who say that nothing can be done are wrong.” Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA), repeatedly insisted in regards to the country’s gun violence crisis at a town hall last week, which was attended by 1,300 of his constituents. I fervently pray that my congressman is right. But if we are to overcome political intransigence and […]

March 15, 2018
Trump Budget Spells Disaster for Even the Most Loyal
Opinion · By

A long lifetime ago, during his presidential campaign, then-candidate Donald Trump positioned himself as the voice of our country’s “forgotten men and women,” particularly the working-class populations of rural areas that industrialization had left behind. He promised that he was a different kind of Republican, one who would save Medicare, Medicaid and other programs benefiting […]

March 1, 2018
Carl Bernstein Explores Echoes of Watergate
News · By

“The best obtainable version of the truth.” Renowned journalist Carl Bernstein repeatedly emphasized this ideal, which he said has guided his decades-long career in reporting, at his lecture at the Temple Emanuel synagogue on Feb. 24. Bernstein was sponsored by the Winston-Salem branch of the United Jewish Appeal and spoke to more than one hundred […]

March 1, 2018
The Top 10 Best Songs in Hamilton
Music · By

Anyone who has known me for about five minutes knows that I love Hamilton with a feverish, almost delirious intensity. It’s not entirely because of my love for the history of the American Revolution. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s tour de force is infused by a sense of momentum, a speeding course of human events that you either […]

February 15, 2018
Democrats Look to Turn the Table in 2018
Opinion · By

U.S. Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-VA) should be feeling nervous as the 2018 midterm elections come into view on the political horizon. Challenged by just one Democrat in 2016, she was re-elected to her second term by only hardly in a gerrymandered monstrosity of a district that Hillary Clinton won by 10 points.

February 15, 2018
Janet Yellen’s Economic Prowess will be Missed at the Fed
Opinion · By

Much of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address was dedicated to patting himself on the back for the “roaring” U.S. economy. It’s true that nearly 10 years into the recovery from the Great Recession, the labor market is practically at full employment, inflation is slow and steady and GDP continues to grow at […]

February 8, 2018
Professor McFall Lectures on Sports Economics
News · By

Todd McFall, a Wake Forest economics professor and sports economist, discussed his research on the governance of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as part of the ZSR Library Lecture Series on Jan. 31. His lecture emphasized the particular governing decisions made by the NCAA and how it organizes its revenue-generating competition and tournaments. McFall […]

February 8, 2018
Jeff Bezos is Tasked with a Moral Monetary Decision
Opinion · By

Like most college students, I am a pretty big fan of Amazon. It’s difficult to remember a time before one could acquire an econometrics textbook, episodes of a television show and a supply of a favorite snack at the same time in a matter of a few clicks. Certainly, founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is […]

February 2, 2018
Deacon Profile: Cameron Steitz
News · By

Senior Cameron Steitz is the Program Director for the Social Justice Incubator (SJI), a space operating through the Pro Humanitate Institute in which students engage and organize around issues of social justice.

February 2, 2018
There are Valuable, Timely Lessons Imparted in The Post
Opinion · By

Steven Spielberg’s drama The Post, which concerns the anxious days surrounding the publication of the Pentagon Papers nearly 50 years ago, is about as heart-thumpingly exhilarating as it gets for journalism nerds. But in addition to being an ode to the fourth estate, the film is hugely relevant today, as President Donald Trump’s antagonism towards […]

January 25, 2018
Shutdown Deal Leaves DACA Concerns Unresolved
News · By

Following three days of contentious negotiations, Congress voted to end the government shutdown on Jan. 22 by passing a stopgap short-term spending bill that funds government operations through Feb. 8. This was the fourth short-term spending bill that Congress has passed since the fiscal year began in October.

January 25, 2018
North Carolina Congressional Map Ruled Unfair
News · By

A federal court ruled North Carolina’s electoral map unconstitutional on Jan. 9 because Republicans had drawn the map seeking a partisan advantage. The court’s opinion stated that the Republican-dominated state legislature had been motivated by “invidious partisan intent” and committed three constitutional violations. As a result, North Carolina will be forced to redraw the boundaries […]

January 18, 2018
Global Politics Deserve Separate but Equal Headspace
Opinion · By

If there was one thing that we got right in 2017, it was that many Americans, ordinarily apathetic to politics, opened a newspaper and generally began to pay more attention to current events. However, this growing awareness was mostly limited to domestic politics. It was heartening how many constituents picked up the phone for the […]

January 18, 2018
Republican Tax Bill Helps the Rich and Hurts Everyone Else
Opinion · By

In 1932, during the deepest abyss of the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt called for “bold, persistent experimentation” and said, “It is common sense to take a method and try it; if it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something.”

December 15, 2017
Male dominance damages the economics profession
Opinion · By

By any reasonable standards, Janet Yellen’s four years as chair of the Federal Reserve — a singularly important job in the global economy — were a success.

December 3, 2017
Roy Moore should leave the Alabama Senate race
Opinion · By

When religion and politics collide, the line between right and wrong is increasingly determined not by unwavering moral clarity but by the letter next to a candidate’s name.

November 17, 2017
Hatch addresses university
Uncategorized · By

At the beginning of his 2017 State of the University Address on Nov. 7, President Nathan O. Hatch observed, “Thomas Edison, a man who held more than a thousand patents, once noted that we often miss opportunity because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.”

November 10, 2017
Zinke’s proposal violates the spirit of national parks
Opinion · By

There is a delight in the hardy life of the open, or so said the father of the U.S. National Park Service, President Theodore Roosevelt.

November 10, 2017
Ralph Northam is the right choice for VA governor
Opinion · By

Over the summer, as Virginia prepared to elect its governor, I was fortunate to see Democratic candidate Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam at a debate with primary opponent Tom Perriello and at a rally in my home city of Alexandria.

November 2, 2017
Two best friends reflect on their friendship
Opinion · By

At the beginning of freshman year of college, it often seemed like everyone else found their best friends immediately.

October 28, 2017
National political organizations form chapters on campus
News · By

The country-wide political divisions of the past year and a half have not left the Wake Forest campus alone.

October 26, 2017
Kyle Ferrer’s writing deserves some appreciation
Opinion · By

Kyle Ferrer remarked one Old Gold & Black production night that he hoped he would receive love letters as a response to his new and improved opinion section head shot.

October 19, 2017
Voter suppression is a serious civil rights problem
Opinion · By

Over half a century ago, as part of his landmark Great Society agenda, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act into law in order to guarantee the elimination of racial discrimination in voting.

October 6, 2017
Al Gore should consider another presidential run
Opinion · By

The heartache and distress of the 2016 presidential race still remain as intense as if the election happened yesterday.

October 3, 2017