Safety is everyone’s responsibility

Last week, “The Princeton Review” came out with “The Best 381 Colleges” rankings and their top-ranked party schools.

In this new ranking, Wake Forest University did not just make the top half of the list, but ranked 14th out of the 381 universities reviewed.

This ranking came as a surprise to many faculty members and students, including the editorial staff of the Old Gold & Black. We were confused by the ranking despite our infamous nickname, “Work Forest.”

We thought that this ranking could not even be remotely true because of the heavy courseload and motivated student body, but there has to be some reason why we managed to earn a spot so high on the list.

This ranking caused us to question  whether we are, in fact, the 14th best party school in the nation.

While we don’t believe Wake Forest merits its spot on the list, we believe there is some truth to this ranking.

Whether or not we agree with the tactics of how we received this ranking, there are dangerous behaviors on campus that cannot be ignored.

Regardless of whether or not this ranking is entirely accurate, there has been a noticeable shift in the social dynamic over the recent years.

Although many students have taken pride in the ranking, the administration has not.

Days after this ranking was released, students received an e-mail about the “concern for personal safety and wellbeing” on campus.

The e-mail brought up important issues on how to drink safely, but also reminded students why they came to Wake Forest: to get a rigorous education that broadens our world view and inspires us to become responsible leaders.

The e-mail outlined simple safety measures when it comes to consuming alcohol and partying.

Everyone should have a good time, but safety is the key factor in these situations. Moderation is important when it comes to anything in life, but especially consuming alcohol.

We take this ranking and the e-mail students received as a learning experience.

As we begin a new year, we are presented with the ideal opportunity to make significant changes to our drinking habits.

As stated in the e-mail, we have the power and responsibility to cater our behavior to how we want our campus to be.

It is the student body’s responsibility to evaluate the newfound ranking, reflect on the e-mail and modify our behavior in order to make responsible and sensible decisions.